erikkwakkel

erikkwakkel:

The art of destruction

These three images represent a realization I had the other day: a damaged or destroyed object may be visually more appealing than the same object in its original state. The top image shows the pulpy remains of the National Library of Iraq, which was destroyed in 2003. At present the library, which included thousands of ancient books, looks more like the surface of a rock than a collection of thoughts and ideas. The charcoaled objects in the middle are three papyrus scrolls from Herculanaeum, a Roman city that was covered by volcanic ash in 79 AD. Its famous library was reduced to cigaret buds like these. The lower book, made in the fifteenth century, is damaged by beetle larvae - “bookworms” - who ate through its pages. As much as I would love to see these objects restored to their full glory, there is something oddly appealing about them in their present state. Sometimes destruction creates beauty.

Pics: the three rolls are Oxford, Bodleian Library, Gr. Class. f. 25-27 (more here); I blogged about them here. The story of the destroyed Iraq National Library is presented here (the image above is from that story). The “bookworm” image is from Emir O Filipovic (@EmirOFilipovic) and I used it in a blog some time ago (here).

burdge
I’m definitely pro-selfie. I think that anybody who’s anti-selfie is really just a hater. Because, truthfully, why shouldn’t people take pictures of themselves? When I’m on Instagram and I see that somebody took a picture of themselves, I’m like, ‘Thank you.’ I don’t need to see a picture of the sky, the trees, plants. There’s only one you. I could Google image search ‘the sky’ and I would probably see beautiful images to knock my socks off. But I can’t Google, you know, ‘What does my friend look like today?’ For you to be able to take a picture of yourself that you feel good enough about to share with the world – I think that’s a great thing.
Ezra Koenig being an angel [x] (via whatevelyn)
uispeccoll

uispeccoll:

Welcome to a very glammy Miniature Monday!

Today’s feature is Looking at Make-up by Marcia Weisbrot.  This accordion book is nestled within its very own makeup compact— mirror, sponge and all.  The book was designed using Quark, Photoshop, hand coloring, hand printing and a stamp (to quote the colophon). The text consists of various meditations on make-up, as well as anecdotes and quotes from actual makeup packaging.  

 Weisbrot, Marcia.  Looking at Makeup. San Francisco: Pencilhead Press, 2001.  Copy 16 out of 25.  Part of the Charlotte Smith Miniature Collection, call no. N7433.4.W45L66.  See it in the catalog here.

See all Miniature Monday Posts

-Laura H.

museumuse

museumuse:

  1. Museums make you less anxious
  2. Museums reduce stress
  3. Museums have the same effect on your well-being as a raise
  4. Museums have a greater impact on your well-being than playing a sport
  5. Museums make you less lonely
  6. Museums are good for the economy
socialmediadesk

Social Media Platforms: A Guide

socialmediadesk:

Hi, I’m Laurenthe Social Media Desk’s intern. I’ve learned quite a bit in my brief stay here. So Wright and Mel encouraged me to share some of my experiences with you.

Much of my time is devoted to curating posts for the main NPR Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest and Twitter accounts. (I have an overwhelming number of tabs open at any given time.) I also work with shows and desks around the building to socialize special projects and answer questions about their personal accounts.

Over the last three months, I’ve gained a deeper understanding of NPR’s main social media platforms through experimentation. (Note: the NPR’s Visuals Team curates the NPR Instagram account.) Here’s some of what I’ve learned about the different kinds of engagement and user behaviors we see on each platform.

Facebook

Facebook users tend to be the most vocal. Posts can have thousands of comments, running from crass to heartfelt to humorous. For every negative comment, there is an equally witty or thoughtful person to balance out the space. The more controversial the story, the higher the user engagement will be

Self-policing is common practice. When someone makes a negative comment, another person swoops in to defend the other side. Users are comfortable defending each other and standing up for their ideas.  

While sharing is the order of the day on Facebook, a great image or quote helps a link go further.

Here’s an example of a quote from Tim Gunn’s interview on Fresh Air that we posted to Facebook. The post got over 8,000 likes and was shared more than 1,000 times. It’s a fun quote, and it’s easier for people to parse instead of a generic text teaser.

Tumblr

The Tumblr set up does not provide the same space for comments. Individual voices are expressed through reblogging the post rather than a written comment. A successful post with 250 notes could have as few as one or two comments with full sentences. Photos work the best, and links are the least popular. 

I wrote an original, short Tumblr post about black bears in Vermont. I thought it was a note-worthy story, but the source didn’t provide an image. In an effort to make the post go as far as possible, I searched in Tumblr for a photo of a black bear. I reblogged the photo from another Tumblr into the NPR account, added my text and voila — the post instantly became more appealing, and we’ve reached a wider audience. 

Twitter

It is easy for something to get buried in a flurry of tweets. This constant stream makes Twitter the least attractive platform for promotion, and best for engagement. When there’s something we’d like to push, we create a hashtag and schedule multiple tweets to reach the widest possible audience.

Our visuals team worked with NPR reporter Nathan Rott and NPR photographer David Gilkey to create an app with their reporting on the controversy surrounding wolves in Montana. We selected facts about wolves and tweeted them throughout the day with a picture, a link to the app and the hashtag WOLFFACT. Doing so increased the audience, and the hashtag allows people to find the story again easily.

Pinterest

With 70 million users, Pinterest holds an incredible amount of potential. Pinterest particularly lends itself to content like food, travel and headlines (in the form of images from NPR’s quote tool.) NPR’s account also provides a space where GIFs and Tiny Desk Concerts can live and be easily accessed. 

The bottom line is that each platform reaches a different audience. It is important to understand the typical users of each platform, as well as NPR consumers in general.

As far as comments go, haters gonna hate.

Varying points of view are welcomed and encouraged to create interesting discussions, of course, but some people are just mean. I learned quickly that a thick skin is key when you work in a digital space. Stay positive, engage the right audience and know your platforms.

librarylinknj
librarylinknj:

(Screen-cap above from my post about this at ALA Think Tank on FB)
You may be a current or former reader of Television Without Pity (affectionately known as TWoP). News broke today that the site is due to be shut down on April 4 by its corporate owner, NBCUniversal. TWoP has been around since 2000, and as of now, it looks like their formidable archive of recaps is going to be taken down when the site closes for business.
Wouldn’t this be an extraordinary project or fond for a library or archive to take on? Think of the value to current & future scholars of internet culture, communications, anthropology and more! Surely, tumblarians & tumblarchivists can figure out a way to prevent this trove of digital culture from disappearing forever.
Thoughts? Ideas? However hare-brained or unlikely, please chime in?

librarylinknj:

(Screen-cap above from my post about this at ALA Think Tank on FB)

You may be a current or former reader of Television Without Pity (affectionately known as TWoP). News broke today that the site is due to be shut down on April 4 by its corporate owner, NBCUniversal. TWoP has been around since 2000, and as of now, it looks like their formidable archive of recaps is going to be taken down when the site closes for business.

Wouldn’t this be an extraordinary project or fond for a library or archive to take on? Think of the value to current & future scholars of internet culture, communications, anthropology and more! Surely, tumblarians & tumblarchivists can figure out a way to prevent this trove of digital culture from disappearing forever.

Thoughts? Ideas? However hare-brained or unlikely, please chime in?